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DNS

DNS (Domain Name Server) is a distributed database that links various host names to specific Internet addresses. The DNS monitor determines the IP addresses of external and internal host names by matching a virtual host name to an expected IP address. If a match is made, the status of the service monitor is OK.

You can, for example, use the DNS monitor to:

  • ensure that your audience can access your Web site or portal by making sure that a selected address can be resolved
  • identify instances in your network environment where resources have had their IP addresses changed, and now the resource is no longer available

To collect performance information, the DNS monitor:

  • opens a UDP socket to a DNS server
  • creates a query packet
  • sends the query packet
  • waits for a response
  • parses the answers

The DNS monitor does not check for the NS or MX records, which return names and not IP addresses. Non-authoritative answers as well as authoritative responses are used.

Before You Begin

Before configuring the DNS monitor, determine the IP address for the host that you want to monitor. For internal hosts, you can use the ipconfig command from the command line.

The ipconfig command returns information similar to the following:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . . : idera.com
IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.1.1.42
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . .: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . .: 10.1.1.1

For external hosts, you can use the nslookup command from the command line as follows:

nslookup <host name>

The nslookup command returns information about the host, similar to the following:

Server: filter.idera.com
Address: 10.1.1.100

Name: idera.com
Addresses: 217.160.226.70, 10.1.1.95, 
192.168.23.1, 192.168.190.1

 

Configuring DNS Monitors

To configure DNS monitors do the following:

  1. In the DNS monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn about monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Hostname to Lookup
      The host name that the monitor checks. The host name can be a Web site address, a server name, or a cluster name.
      For example, for a Web site enter www.idera.com in this field.
    • Port
      The number of the port on which the DNS server is listening. The default is 53.
    • IP Address
      The IP address for which you want to check. If this address is not returned, the status of the service monitor becomes Critical.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds for the amount of time required to complete a service check. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

FTP

The FTP monitor can determine:

  • whether an FTP server is listening or is available on a specified port
  • the response time of an FTP server

The FTP monitor tries to open an FTP connection to the server. If the response takes longer than the defined thresholds, Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert.

Configuring FTP Monitors

To configure FTP monitors, do the following:

  1. In the FTP monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Port
      The number of the port number on which the FTP server is listening. The default is 21.
    • Server Response
      Enter the Warning and Critical time thresholds required to receive a ready response from the FTP server. A server ready response can look like the following:
      220 filter FTP server (Version wu-2.6.2(1) Mon Dec 3 15:29:55 EST 2005) ready
    • For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds for the length of time that the service check takes to complete. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish .

HTTP (Web Services)

The HTTP (Web Services) monitor simulates the steps that you take to access a Web site. Using this monitor, you can verify several things:

  • you can access a Web site using HTTP
  • you can log on to a Web site
  • a Web site is running according to your expectations

You can determine this by examining the values that are returned from the Web server.

The HTTP (Web Services) monitor relies on a Universal Resource Identifier (URI), which defines a specific file location on a Web server. This monitor can test for application calls, database responses, or any other information that a URI can return.

Configuring HTTP (Web Services) Monitors

To configure HTTP (Web Services) monitors, do the following:

  1. In the HTTP (Web Services) monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
  2. To learn about monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  3. Complete the following fields:
    • URI
      The URI of the Web page that you want to monitor. For example, 
      /login.php .
    • Text to Look For (Optional)
      Enter the text that you want the monitor to search for in the response from the server.
      This monitor parses the text from the server and, using the threshold values you enter, determines if the entire Web page returned by the server is within acceptable parameters.
      For example, if a Web page is returned then the monitor parses the entire page for the text that you input to match against. If you want to ensure that a particular page is returned, you could enter <TITLE>Expected Page</TITLE> , where Expected Page is the title of the Web page. The monitor generates an alert if this page is not matched.
    • Authentication
      The user ID and password, in the form userid:password . For example:
      jlamport:bluefrog5
    • Virtual Host
      The unique domain name that resolves to the IP address of the domain that you want to monitor. A virtual host has its own domain name, but has the same IP address as other domain names hosted by the Web server.
    • Server Response
      Enter a string to match against the response from the server. For example, HTTP/1.1 200 OK or HTTP 404 - File not found . Then, set the Warning and Critical comparison methods. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds
    • Follow Redirect Actions
      Select an action that enables you to specify whether you want to be redirected to another Web address:
      • OK
        Return an OK status for any re-direction.
      • Follow
        Follow any re-direction.
      • Warning
        Return a Warning status for any re-direction.
      • Critical
        Return a Critical status for any re-direction.
    • POST String
      The URL-encoded POST string to be sent to the server. This string simulates what a Web browser sends to a Web server CGI script or binary. You can use the POST string to, for example, simulate logging into a Web application.
      For example, if you define the POST string as userid=bob&sku=123456 , the page to request would be /cgi-bin/sku_lookup . The text “ SKU count is ” is the expected response. If the SKU lookup is not successful or if the response from the application server is not fast enough, then Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert.
    • Set-Cookie String
      The parameters that define the cookie. The cookie string uses the following format:
      domain:name:value:path
      If configuring multiple cookies for the monitor, separate each cookie string with a semicolon:
      •  domain is the subdomain the cookie is available to.
      •  name is a name with which you can later reference the cookie.
      •  value is a regular string to be stored as a cookie. The string should be encoded using URL-style %xx encoding, which converts all reserved and unsafe characters - such as tildes (~) and spaces - to their ASCII equivalents.
        For example, using %xx encoding, the URL http://www.mydomain.com/~jdoe/index.html becomes http://www.mydomain.com/%7ejdoe/index.htmlpath is the location on the server in which the cookie is made available. For example, if the path is “ / ” the cookie is available to the entire domain, as opposed to a specific subdirectory name.
        d1:n1:v1:p1;d2:n2:v2:p2
        The name and value pair is the only required attribute of the Set-Cookie String field.
    • HTTP Header Settings
      The HTTP header settings for the response.
      The HTTP header settings define the syntax and semantics of all standard HTTP/1.1 header fields. For entity header fields, both sender and recipient refer to either the client or the server, depending on who sends and who receives the entity.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds
  4. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  5. Complete the following settings:
  6. Click Finish.

IMAP (Email Retrieval)

The IMAP (Email Retrieval) monitor confirms whether an IMAP server is doing the following:

  • listening on a defined port
  • running on a defined system or on a group of systems
  • using a particular version

Configuring IMAP (Email Retrieval) Monitors

To configure IMAP (Email Retrieval) monitors, do the following:

  1. In the IMAP (Email Retrieval) monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Port
      The number of the port on which IMAP is listening.
      The default is 143 . If you are applying a monitor to a service group, ensure that all of the systems use the defined port. Otherwise, create a monitor for each IMAP instance that listens on a different port.
      For information on service groups, see Service Groups.
    • Server Response
      Select a comparison method, and then enter the Warning and Critical thresholds for the server response. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
      The server response is the same for Windows, UNIX, and Linux. For example, an expected response is:

      +OK [CAPABILITY IMAP4REV1 LOGIN-REFERRALS STARTTLS AUTH=LOGIN] filter IMAP4rev1 2002.336 at Thu, 2 Jun 2005 10:55:02 -400 (EDT)

      If IMAP is not available, then the following is an expected response:

      BAD Null command


      By making string comparisons on the returned values to the monitor, you can check:

      • The version of IMAP that is running to support your network routing.
      • The system on which IMAP is or is not running.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds for the length of time a service check takes to complete. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

LDAP

LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a protocol that organizes directory hierarchies and enables communication with directory servers. Individuals in an organization can use LDAP to search for information, files, or devices in a network.

The LDAP monitor can check for any settings or information in your LDAP directory. The monitor can start the check from any location within your LDAP directory structure.

The LDAP monitor attempts to match information that you have specified with information available in your LDAP directory. If the monitor finds the information, the service monitor returns a status of OK. Otherwise, the monitor returns a Critical error and Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert.

If you do not specify any parameters, then this monitor only validates that an LDAP server is listening on the specified port.

Before You Begin

To configure the LDAP monitor, you should understand how an LDAP directory works, and know how LDAP is configured in your environment. You can use the following tools to determine the Base, Bind, and Attribute values of the LDAP directory for which you want to search:

  • at the Windows command line, use ntdsutil.exe to retrieve information
  • one of the many freely-available LDAP browsing and editing tools
  • your own network documentation and determine whether the proper configurations are maintained

Configuring LDAP Monitors

To configure LDAP monitors, do the following:

  1. In the LDAP monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Port
      The number of the port number on which the LDAP server is listening. The default is 389 .
    • Password
      The password that is required to log in to the LDAP server.
    • Base
      The location in the LDAP directory from which you want the monitor to begin searching for information.

      Using this directory structure, you can check your LDAP structure for your European employees by selecting the following as your base:
      dc=ldap,dc=uptime,ou=employees,ou=Europe
    • Bind
      The Bind string, which associates user account properties and LDAP account attributes. This string gives you access to the Base location of your LDAP directory structure.
      The format of the Bind string must match the Base location of your LDAP directory structure. For example, if you are checking for information found below the European employees directory, you can 
      use the following Bind string:
      cn=ldapadmin,dc=ldap,dc=uptime,dc=com
      Depending on your network security model, you must have domain controller administration privileges to bind to the locations on which you want to match information.
    • Attribute
      The attribute or information for which you want to search in your LDAP directory.
      An LDAP entry consists of a set of attributes. Each attribute has a type - which describes the kind of information contained in the attribute - and one or more values, which contain the actual data. For example, the entry [email protected] has the Attribute value [email protected] . The Attribute type is e-mail .
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

NFS

NFS (Network File System) enables UNIX and Linux systems to share directories across a network; it also allows file sharing between Windows and non-Windows systems. The NFS service monitor can determine the performance of your NFS server and its ability to communicate with NFS clients by measuring the available NFS mounts.

This monitor runs the showmount -e command to extract the number of NFS file systems that are exported. If the showmount command fails, then Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert.

The NFS monitor is currently not supported on Windows 7 SP1 running on 64-bit platforms.

To use the service monitor with Windows Server 2012 systems, be sure to install the Services for Network File System MMC snap-in using the Add Roles Wizard from the Server Manager. This action gives non-Windows clients access to files on your server. 

Configuring NFS Monitors

To configure NFS monitors, do the following:

  1. In the NFS monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Mounts: select a comparison method, then enter the Warning and Critical Mount thresholds for the number of mounts on which NFS is loaded
    • Response Time: enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds for the length of time a service check takes to complete (for more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds)
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the metric data to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

NIS/YP

NIS/YP (Network Information Services/Yellow Pages) is a distributed database system that enables you to configure multiple hosts from a central location as well as store and maintain common configuration information in that location. You can then propagate the information to all of the nodes in a network. The collection of network information is referred to as the NIS namespace .

The NIS/YP monitor performs a lookup on the domain, table, and key, enabling you to:

  • check that a Network Information Service (NIS) server for a given domain is responding
  • request a specific key from a NIS table. This is useful if the contents of the NIS maps are often rebuilt

Configuring NIS/YP Monitors

To configure NIS/YP monitors, do the following:

  1. In the NIS/YP monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following NIS/YP monitor settings:
    • YP/NIS Domain
      The domain of the NIS service. For example, idera.com. NIS administration databases that contain name service information are called maps . A domain is a collection of systems that share a common set of NIS maps.
    • YP/NIS Table
      The name of the NIS/YP table that contains the values for which you want to search.
    • Key
      Enter a value you want to search for in the NIS table. For example, the key is jsmith in the following string returned from a NIS table:

      jsmith:LLZDusFe5Da3s:20080:100:Jim Smith:/export/home/jsmith:/bin/sh
    • Lookup
      The Lookup value associated with the value in the Key field. For example, the following is returned from the passwd table of a NIS database based on the key jsmith :

      jsmith:LLZDusFe5Da3s:20080:100:Jim Smith:/export/home/jsmith:/bin/sh
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds for the length of time that a service check takes to complete. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

NNTP (Network News)

NNTP is a protocol for distributing, searching, retrieving, and posting of messages and news articles from USENET (a global collection of online discussion groups). NNTP stores content in a central database, enabling subscribers to select only the messages and articles that they want to read.

The NNTP (Network News) monitor measures the performance of your NNTP server. It can also determine the server status in terms of the following:

Command Implementation 

Status reports from the server indicate the response to the last command that was received from the client. Status response lines begin with a three-digit numeric code, which is used to distinguish between all responses.

The first digit of the response broadly indicates the success, failure, or progress of the previous command:

  • 1xx - an informative message
  • 2xx - the command is OK
  • 3xx - the command OK to this point, but the rest of it is sent
  • 4xx - the command was correct, but could not be carried out
  • 5xx - the command is not implemented, or it is incorrect, or a serious program error has occurred

Response Category

The next digit in the status response code indicates the function response category.

  • x0x - connection, setup, and miscellaneous messages
  • x1x - newsgroup selection
  • x2x - article selection
  • x3x - distribution functions
  • x4x - posting
  • x8x - nonstandard extensions
  • x9x - debugging output

Response Codes

The following is a list of general response codes that may be sent by an NNTP server. These are not specific to any one command, but may be returned as the result of a connection, a failure, or an unusual condition.

  • 100 - help text
  • 190 through 199 - debugging output
  • 200 - the server is ready and posting is allowed
  • 201 - the server is ready, but no posting is allowed
  • 400 - service is discontinued
  • 500 - the command is not recognized
  • 501 - a command syntax error occurred
  • 502 - an access restriction or permission is denied
  • 503 - a program fault occurred and the command was not executed

You can ignore 1xx codes. Code 200 or 201 is sent upon initial connection to the NNTP server, depending upon the posting permission. Code 400 is sent when the NNTP server discontinues service - for example, by request of the operator. The 5xx codes indicate that the command could not be performed for some unusual reason.

Configuring NNTP (Network News) Monitors

To configure NNTP (Network News) monitors, do the following:

  1. In the NNTP (Network News) monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Port
      The number of the port on which the NNTP server is listening. The default is 119 .
    • Server Response
      The server response according to the value that you want to measure.
      For information on command implementation, see Command Implementation.
      For information on response categories, see Response Category.
      For information on general response, see Response Codes.
  3. Response Time
    Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  4. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  5. Complete the following settings:
  6. Click Finish.

Ping

The Ping monitor determines whether you can communicate with other IP addresses or domain names. The Ping monitor can check the following:

  • whether you can reach a specified system
  • the amount of time required to bounce a packet off of another site

You receive a response if the connections are good and the target system is running. If you have successfully pinged a system in the past, but you cannot get a response, there is a problem either with the network or with the system. If it takes a long time for a ping to return, the network or system may be extremely busy.

The ping program sends a small packet of information containing 64 bytes - 56 bytes of data and eight bytes of protocol reader information. The computer that sent the packet listens for a reply from the specified IP address. The ping program then evaluates this reply, and Uptime Infrastructure Monitor captures the report that the program displays.

Configuring Ping Monitors

To configure Ping monitors, do the following:

  1. In the Ping monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn about monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Number to send
      The number of packets to send to an IP address or domain name.
      This value determines the number of times the ping command attempts to contact a server.
    • Average Round Trip Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical thresholds for the average round trip time for the number of packets sent by the ping command. The round trip time is in milliseconds.
      This value is a good indicator of ping performance because a variety of factors - including different packet paths to and from the server - can affect the round trip time of a packet.
    • Percent Loss
      Enter the Warning and Critical thresholds for the number of packets that did not returned a reply. For example, if four packets were sent and only two are returned, the percent loss is 50%.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response thresholds for the length of time the service check takes to complete. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

POP (Email Retrieval)

The POP (Email Retrieval) service monitor checks the status of POP2 servers (which requires SMTP to send messages) and POP3 servers.

Use the POP (Email Retrieval) monitor to verify whether a POP server is doing the following:

  • listening on a defined port
  • running on a defined system
  • running on a group of systems
  • running a particular version of POP

Configuring POP (Email Retrieval) Monitors

To configure POP (Email Retrieval) monitors, do the following:

  1. In the POP (Email Retrieval) monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn about monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Expected Server Response
      Enter the response from the server, as a string, that determines whether a connection is made to the POP service. Then, set the Warning and Critical thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
      The expected server response is the same for Windows, Solaris, and Linux. For example, if the POP service is available then the following is an expected response:

      +OK POP3 <server name> v2002.81 server ready


      If the POP service is not available, the following is an expected response:

      -ERR Null command
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

SSH (Secure Shell)

The SSH (Secure Shell) monitor determines if the secure shell utility (SSH) is available and is running on the defined port. SSH is both a program and a network protocol for securely logging into and executing commands on a remote computer. It provides secure encrypted communications between two untrusted hosts over an insecure network.

Configuring SSH (Secure Shell) Monitors

To configure SSH (Secure Shell) monitors, do the following:

  1. In the SSH (Secure Shell) monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete Secure Shell monitor settings by entering the appropriate Warning and Critical thresholds.
    For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
    • Port
      The number of the port on which SSH is listening. The default is 22 .
    • Major
      The major version number of SSH. This is the number immediately to the left of the decimal in the version number. In the following example, the major version number is 2:

      SSH_2.0_SUN_SSH1.0
    • Minor
      The minor version number of SSH. This is the number immediately to the right of the decimal in the version number. In the following example the major version number is 0:

      SSH_2.0_SUN_SSH1.0
    • SSH Server Version
      The version of the SSH server that you want to monitor. This is the string immediately following the major and minor version numbers of SSH. In the following example the SSH server version is

      SUN_SSH1.0 :
      SSH_2.0_SUN_SSH1.0
    •  Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds for the overall time required to perform a service check. For more information, Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

SMTP (Email Delivery)

The SMTP monitor tests a mail server for the standard mail response header. If the mail server does not respond within the specified thresholds, Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert.

Configuring SMTP (Email Delivery) Monitors

To configure SMTP (Email Delivery) Monitors, do the following:

  1. In the SMTP (Mail Delivery) monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Port
      The number of the port on which the SMTP server is listening. The default is 25 .
    • Expected Server Response
      Enter the Warning and Critical thresholds for the amount of time that is required to send and receive a ready response from the SMTP server.
      For example, the following response reveals the ready status of the SMTP server:

      For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.

      220 mail.yourdomain.com ESMTP
      Sendmail 8.12.10+SUN/8.12.8; 
      Tue, 14 Dec 2005 13:25:15: -0400 <EDT>
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

SNMP Poller

The SNMP Poller provides extensive network monitoring by allowing you to focus on specific SNMP OID values, and use them to monitor and alert on the performance of SNMP-based network devices.

SNMP OID Data Types and Formats

The SNMP service monitor works with the OID data types listed below. When configuring an SNMP Poller, you can specify whether the service monitor processes different data value formats (e.g., an SnmpInt object’s returned value can be processed by the service monitor as a string or an integer). The following table also outlines correct data type and value format combinations.

MIB Type

Data Type

Value Format(s)

SnmpOID

string

raw

SnmpIpAddress

string

raw

SnmpOctetString

string

raw

SnmpTimeticks

integer

raw, rate, counter

SnmpInt

string

raw

integer

raw, rate, counter

SnmpGauge32

integer

raw, rate, counter

SnmpCounter32

integer

raw, rate, counter

SnmpCounter64

integer

raw, rate, counter

SnmpOpaque

string

raw

integer

rate, counter

 

Adding MIBs to Uptime Infrastructure Monitor

Uptime Infrastructure Monitor ships with a large set of MIBs that are available when configuring an SNMP Poller. The resulting OIDs are viewed in the MIB Browser, which is displayed when creating or editing an SNMP Poller service monitor.

If desired, you can add new MIBs to augment or replace OIDs in the default list. These MIBs should be copied to the <uptime>/mib directory. If you are considering adding your own MIBs to this directory, consider the following:

  • when adding MIBs, ensure you are observing their dependencies
  • after adding MIBs, restart the Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Data Collector service (see Stopping and Restarting Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Services); upon restarting, Uptime Infrastructure Monitor moves the newly-added MIBs to the DataStore for use by the MIB Browser
  • added MIBs are processed alphabetically, so an identically named OID from a later MIB takes precedence; note that the default MIBs included with Uptime Infrastructure Monitor are always parsed before other MIBs

Note that there is a core set of MIBs that Uptime Infrastructure Monitor ’s SNMP functionality requires. The nodes belonging to these MIBs always take precedence over any others added to Uptime Infrastructure Monitor:

  • SNMPv2-SMI
  • SNMPv2-TC
  • SNMPv2-CONF
  • SNMPv2-MIB
  • RFC1213-MIB
  • IF-MIB
  • HOST-RESOURCES-MIB
Configuring an SNMP Poller

To configure an SNMP Poller, do the following:

  1. In the SNMP Poller template, complete the monitor information fields.
    This includes selecting the network device Element or Element group to which this service monitor is assigned. For more information on configuring monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. In the SNMP Polling Settings section, click Add OID .
    The Add OID pop-up window appears.
  3. Select an object using one of the two methods:
    • Enter a MIB object identifier (e.g., .1.3.6.1.2.1.1.1 ) in the Manual OID field, then press the Enter key.
      The MIB tree expands to display the branch of the inputted object, and the information panel updates to show its description.
    • Navigate the MIB tree to manually locate the object.
  4. In the Test Against section, select the network device to which you want to assign this SNMP Poller, and then click Test.
    Performing this step ensures the OID is available on the Element. If the test is successful, a message appears similar to the following:

    OK 1 result for .1.3.6.1.2.1.1.1
    Cisco IOS Software, C3750 Software (C3750-IPBASE-M), Version 12.2(35)SE5, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
    Copyright (c) 1986-2007 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
    Compiled Thu 19-Jul-07 19:15 by nachen
  5. In the Collection Info section, optionally modify the data type, and value handling options.
    In most cases, the OID selected in step 3 determines the data type, and if applicable, the most appropriate format for the object’s value. Because of this, when you select an OID, the configuration options in the Collection Info section are automatically set accordingly.
    However, some OIDs return a data type that can be processed by Uptime Infrastructure Monitor either as a string or an integer. In other cases, you may want Uptime Infrastructure Monitor to handle a returned OID value differently. (For information on OID data types, see SNMP OID Data Types and Formats.)
    Regardless, ensure you select the data type that matches how you want the returned value to be used to create alerting thresholds:
    • String
      This type of returned value allows you to create syntactically comparative alerting thresholds (e.g., “ does not contain ”).
    • Integer
      This type of returned value allows you to create quantitatively comparative alerting thresholds (e.g., “ not equal to ”).
    If the integer data type is enabled, ensure the appropriate value-handling method is selected:
    • Raw value
      The OID’s returned value is passed to Uptime Infrastructure Monitor in the exact form as defined by the MIB.
    • Rate per second
      This is the OID value’s rate of change between samples, whether positive or negative. The OID’s returned value is compared to the previously retrieved one; Uptime Infrastructure Monitor divides the difference by the number of seconds that comprise the polling interval.
    • Delta between samples
      This is the difference between the current OID value, and the value retrieved from the previous polling interval.

     

    If you select a combination of data type and value format that cannot logically match the OID selected, you are able to save the OID profile; however, when the SNMP Poller is run, this invalid combination causes an error.
  6. Once you have tested the OID with an existing network monitor Element, and have verified or reconfigured its Collection Info details, click Next .
  7. In the Basic Metric Info section, for graphing and configuration purposes, confirm the use of the MIB-supplied object name, or enter a new unique name.
  8. Optionally provide a Description of the object value.
  9. Select the Unit of measurement to associated with collected object values.
    If the object is a string data type, select the “blank” option.
  10. If the Integer data type was selected in step 5, indicate whether you want to save the OID’s collected data for graphing.
  11. If the selected OID’s returned value is table-based, indicate how you want returned rows to be labeled:
    • Use Interface Names
      The network device’s known interface names are used to label rows.
    • Use Table Column
      Select a label from the list of known columns for the selected table row.
  12. Click Save.
    You are returned to the SNMP Poller configuration window, and the configured OID is added to the list in alphabetical order.
  13. Repeat steps 2 through 12 until you have finished adding all the OIDs you would like to comprise this SNMP Poller.
  14. In the Response Time section, enter Warning and Critical response time thresholds.
    For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  15. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  16. Complete the following settings:
  17. Click Finish.
Editing OIDs for an SNMP Poller

To configure an OID that is part of an existing SNMP Poller, do the following:

  1. Open the Edit Service Monitor window for the SNMP Poller
    This configuration window can be displayed by clicking Edit Info from the service monitor’s main Info page, or by clicking the SNMP Poller’s Edit icon when viewing in the main list of service monitors.
  2. In the SNMP Poller Settings section, locate the OID you want to modify, then click its Edit icon.
    The Edit OID pop-up window is displayed.
  3. In the Basic Metric Info section, if desired, enter a new unique name.
  4. Optionally provide a Description of the object value.
  5. Select the Unit of measurement to associated with collected object values.
    If the object is a string data type, select the “blank” option.

    If you change the unit of measurement, generated graphs and reports that retrieve older data use the previously configured unit of measurement.
  6. If the OID value’s data type is “Integer” indicate whether the OID’s collected data is saved for graphing.
  7. If the selected OID’s returned value is table-based, indicate how the returned rows are to be labeled:
    • Use Interface Names
      The network device’s known interface names are used to label rows.
    • Use Table Column
      Select a label from the list of known columns for the selected table row.
  8. Click Save.
    You are returned to the SNMP Poller configuration window.
  9. Repeat steps 2through 8 until you have finished modifying all the OIDs that to comprise this SNMP Poller.
  10. Click Finish

Network Device Port Monitor

The port monitor provides essential network monitoring: it monitors and alerts on network device port bandwidth and performance, as well as port status in general. This service monitor works with performance data collected from a monitored network device Element, and its alerting can be applied to all of the Element’s ports, a specific type of port, or individually selected ports.

The port monitor can answer the following types of questions:

  • What is the bandwidth usage on my network device ports?
  • Are there too many packet discards or errors for a specific port?
  • Can I get an alert if a specific type of port goes down?

Performance monitoring and port status checks are only done to ports whose polled status (i.e., ifAdminStatus ) is “ up ” at the time of initial service monitor configuration. A port whose polled status at the time of port monitor creation is polled as “ down ” or “ unknown ” do not trigger any alerts.

Understanding Port Status Checks

The port status check triggers an alert when a port’s ifOperStatus state changes from an “ up ” to a “ down ” state from one check to the next. Note that the following port states are ignored:

  • dormant
  • lowerLayerDown
  • notPresent
  • unknown
  • testing

The status check makes use of data retrieved by the assigned network device’s Platform Performance Gatherer service; it does not rely on an external service check, such as a ping monitor. As such, when configuring the port monitor, ensure its Performance Time Interval and Check Interval settings are complementary (e.g., the status check should occur less frequently than how often performance data is gathered).

If a status-checking port monitor is running for the first time, because there is no last known status for comparison, the monitor treats the port’s status as “up”, and re-check at configured intervals for the next 60 minutes. After this period, the port monitor’s status is reset to OK . This behavior exists to prevent false positives where an administrator has removed network cables during maintenance, but has not set the network device’s ifAdminStatus to “ down ” or “ testing ”.

This first-run behavior is also applicable to other scenarios:

  • the network device to which the port monitor is attached has its state changed to MAINT , then back to OK
  • the Core service is restarted, regardless of the network device’s status
Network Device Port Performance Metrics

The following metrics can be used to configure alert thresholds for a port monitor:

Total Rate

the total throughput, in Mbps

In Rate

the average throughput of inbound packets, in Mbps

Out Rate

the average throughput of outbound packets, in Mbps

Usage

the percentage of the port’s maximum throughput that was used by inbound and outbound packets

In Usage

the percentage of the port’s maximum throughput that was used by inbound packets

Out Usage

the percentage of the port’s maximum throughput that was used by outbound packets

Errors

the average number of errors per second

In Errors

the average number of errors per second that occurred for inbound packets

Out Errors

the average number of errors per second that occurred for outbound packets

Discards

the average number of packets discarded per second

In Discards

the average number of inbound packets discarded per second

Out Discards

the average number of outbound packets per second

 

Configuring a Port Monitor

To configure a Port Monitor for a network device Element, do the following:

  1. In the Port Monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    This includes selecting the network device Element or Element group to which this service monitor is assigned. For more information on configuring monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. For the Performance Time Interval , enter a positive integer indicating the number of minutes' worth of performance data to average and compare against threshold definitions.
  3. Select the ports on the network device Element(s) whose performance and status you want to monitor:
    • All Detected Ports
      Uptime Infrastructure Monitor monitors any port it detects on the assigned network device Element, or Element group
    • All Ports of Type
      Allows you to focus on a specific type of port for monitoring. The list is based on the ifType OID, whose values are IANA-assigned interface types.
    • Specific Ports
      Select a network device Element to Show ports from, then from the list select which ports you want to monitor.
  4. In the Port Performance Check section’s Value field, select the port metric that you want to use to define the alerting threshold.
  5. Enter the thresholds that trigger a warning- and critical-level alert.
  6. In the Port Status Checking section, confirm whether this port monitor also performs a Status Check.
  7. In the Response Time section, enter Warning and Critical response time thresholds.
    For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  8. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  9. Complete the following settings:
  10. Click Finish.

TCP

The TCP monitor can determine whether a service or application is listening on a specific port. This monitor can also execute commands against an application or a service listening on a port and evaluate the result.

By extending the TCP monitor to evaluate the returned string based on a command over a network using TCP, you can test and monitor for a wide variety of responses.

For example, to have Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generate an alert if the file Weekly_Report was changed in your source code control system, you can send the string:

get -e Weekly_Report1

and set the critical threshold value to 1.2 , where 1.1 represents no changes and 1.2 or greater represents one or more changes to the document.

Configuring TCP Monitors

To configure TCP monitors, do the following:

  1. In the TCP monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Port
      The number of the port on which the service or application that you want to monitor is listening.

      To check whether an application is listening on a port, leave the remaining TCP service monitor settings blank.
    • String to Send
      The string that contains the command to which the service or application can respond.
    • Use SSL
      Select this option if your connection uses SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) for security.
    • String to Receive
      The string that is returned by the specified port and host. The string is the response to the command that was specified in the String to Send field.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Click the Save for Graphing checkbox to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

 

 

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