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Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Agent

The Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Agent monitor determines whether an agent is running on a system that you are monitoring. For a list of the currently-supported platforms, see Monitored Application Platform Support.

Configuring Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Agent Monitors

To configure Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Agent monitors, do the following:

  1. In the Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Agent monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following options by clicking the checkbox beside each option, then specifying a warning and critical threshold.
    If the thresholds that you set are exceeded, then Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. To save the data from the thresholds for graphing or reporting, click the Save for Graphing checkbox beside each of the metrics that you selected in step 3.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

Exchange

The Exchange 2003 and Exchange monitors identify when certain performance counters for Microsoft Exchange servers have exceeded user-defined thresholds. These thresholds can be, for example, an inordinately high number of inbound connections or a rapidly-growing message queue. Whenever a threshold exceeds a warning or critical amount, Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert.

Use Uptime Infrastructure Monitor ’s Exchange 2003 monitor if you are using and monitoring Microsoft Exchange 2000 or 2003; use the Exchange monitor for later versions (e.g., Microsoft Exchange 2007 and 2010).

Configuring Exchange 2003 Monitors

To configure an Exchange 2003 monitor for your Microsoft Exchange 2000 or 2003 server, do the following:

  1. Complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following settings by clicking the checkbox beside each option, and then specifying a warning and critical threshold.
    If the thresholds that you set are exceeded, then Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
    • Web Mail Sends Per Second
      The maximum number of messages that can be sent from the Exchange server each second.
    • Web Mail Auths Per Second
      The maximum number of authorization requests that can be sent to the Exchange server each second.
    • SMTP Bytes Sent Per Second
      The total number of bytes sent per second by the Exchange SMTP server.
    • SMTP Bytes Received Per Second
      The total number of bytes received per second by the Exchange SMTP server.
    • SMTP Bytes Total Per Second
      The total number of bytes of information passing through the Exchange SMTP server each second.
    • SMTP Local Queue Length
      The number of messages in the SMTP queue that are scheduled for local delivery.
    • SMTP Messages Per Second
      The maximum number of messages per second that are allowed by the SMTP server.
    • SMTP Inbound Connections
      The number of incoming connections that the SMTP server allows.
    • SMTP Outbound Connections
      The number of outbound connections that the server allows to all remote domains.
    • SMTP Connection Errors Per Second
      The number of number of connection errors that occur per second.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. To save the data from the thresholds for graphing or reporting, click the Save for Graphing checkbox beside each of the metrics that you selected in step 2.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

Configuring Exchange Monitors

To configure an Exchange monitor for your Microsoft Exchange 2007 or 2010 server, do the following:

  1. Complete the monitor information fields.
  2. To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  3. Complete the following settings by clicking the checkbox beside each option, and then specifying a warning and critical threshold.
    If the thresholds that you set are exceeded, then Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
    • SMTP Bytes Sent Per Second
      The total number of bytes sent per second by the Exchange SMTP server.
    • SMTP Bytes Received Per Second
      The total number of bytes received per second by the Exchange SMTP server.
    • SMTP Messages Sent Per Second
      The maximum number of messages sent per second allowed by the SMTP server.
    • SMTP Messages Received Per Second
      The maximum number of messages received per second allowed by the SMTP server.
    • SMTP Average Bytes Per Message
      The average number of message bytes per inbound message received, indicating the size of messages received through an SMTP receive connector.
    • SMTP Inbound Connections
      The number of incoming connections that the SMTP server allows.
    • SMTP Outbound Connections
      The number of outbound connections that the server allows to all remote domains.
    • Average Delivery Time
      The average time, in milliseconds, between an Exchange server receiving a message from the client, and an Exchange server delivering the message to an Inbox.
    • Active Connections
      The number of connections to the Exchange store that have shown activity in the last 10 minutes.
    • Active Client Logons
      The number of clients that performed any action within the last 10-minute time interval.
    • Active User Count
      The number of unique user connections that have logged on to the server and shown activity in the last 10-minute time interval.
    • Current Webmail Users
      The number of unique users currently logged in to Outlook Web Access. This counter decreases when users manually log out or their sessions time out.
    • Webmail User Logons Per Second
      The number of Outlook Web Access logins or login attempts per second.
    • RPC Averaged Latency
      The average time, in milliseconds, it takes for the last 1,024 packets to be processed.
    • RPC Operations Per Second
      The rate that RPC operations occur, and implicitly, how how many RPC requests are outstanding.
    • RPC Requests
      The number of client requests that are currently processed by the Exchange store.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  4. To save the data from the thresholds for graphing or reporting, click the Save for Graphing checkbox beside each of the metrics that you selected in step 2.
  5. Complete the following settings:
  6. Click Finish.

IIS

The IIS (Internet Information Server) service monitor checks the performance of an IIS Web server, based on thresholds that you set against common IIS performance counters. You can use this monitor to determine whether IIS is running on a defined port, and according to the thresholds you have set on common performance counters.

Configuring IIS Monitors

To configure IIS monitors, do the following:

  1. In the IIS monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following settings by clicking the checkbox beside each option, and then specifying a warning and critical threshold.
    If the thresholds that you set are exceeded, then Uptime Infrastructure Monitor generates an alert. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
    • Bytes Sent / Sec.
      The number of bytes that are sent by the server each second.
    • Bytes Received / Sec.
      The number of bytes that are received by the server each second.
    • Anonymous Users / Sec.
      The rate, in seconds, at which users have made anonymous requests to the IIS server.
    • Non-anonymous Users / Sec.
      The rate, in seconds, at which registered users have made non anonymous requests to the IIS service.

      IIS 6.0+ treats both an anonymous and a non-anonymous user request as a new user.
    • Current Connections
      The number of active connections to the IIS server.
    • Connection Attempts / Sec.
      The number of connection attempts that are made, per second, since the IIS server was started.
    • Logon Attempts / Sec.
      The number of attempts, per second, that are made to log on to the server.
    • Get Requests / Sec.
      The rate, in seconds, at which HTTP requests using the GET method are made to the server.
    • Post Requests / Sec.
      The rate, in seconds, at which HTTP requests using the POST method are made to the server.
    • CGI Requests / Sec.
      The rate, in seconds, at which the server is processing simultaneous CGI (Common Gateway Interface) requests.
    • ISAPI Requests / Sec.
      The rate, in seconds, at which the server is processing ISAPI extension requests.
      ISAPI enables programmers to develop Web applications that are tightly integrated with IIS. ISAPI can also provide security functions to Windows servers and database connections through IIS.
    • Not Found Errors / Sec.
      The maximum number of 404 file not found errors - indicating that the requested document cannot be found on the server - that can occur each second.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds for the length of time a service check takes to complete. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. To save the data from the thresholds for graphing or reporting, click the Save for Graphing checkbox beside each of the metrics that you selected in step 3.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

WebLogic

The WebLogic monitor collects data that enables you to determine whether there is a performance problem or a failure on a WebLogic application server. Using the data that the WebLogic monitor collects, you can determine the root cause of the issue by generating a report (see Reports for J2EE Applications for more information).

The WebLogic monitor collects the following metrics from a WebLogic server:

VariablesMetrics
Connection Pools
FailuresToReconnectCount

The number of times that the connection pool failed to reconnect to a data store.

ConnectionDelayTime

The average time that was required to connect to a connection pool.

ActiveConnectionsCurrentCount

The current number of active connections in a JDBC connection pool.

ActiveConnectionsHighCount

The highest number of active connections in a JDBC connection pool.

LeakedConnectionsCount

The total number of connections that are checked out of, but not returned to, the connection pool.

CurrCapacity

The current number of database connections in the JDBC connection pool.

NumAvailable

The number of available sessions in the session pool that are not currently used.

WaitingForConnectionCurrentCount

The current number of requests that are waiting for a connection to the connection pool.

Per EJB
AccessTotalCount

The total number of times an attempt was made to get an EJB instance from the free pool.

BeansInCurrentUseCount

The number of EJB instances in the free pool which are currently in use.

CachedBeansCurrentCount

The total number of EJBs that are in the execution cache.

ActivationCount

The number of EJBs that are activated.

Other
HeapSizeCurrent

The amount of memory, in bytes, that is in the WebLogic server’s JVM heap.

HeapFreeCurrent

The current amount of free memory, in bytes, that is in the WebLogic server’s JVM heap.

OpenSocketsCurrentCount

The current number sockets on the server that are open and receiving requests.

AcceptBacklog

The number of requests that are waiting for a TCP connection.

ExecuteThreadCurrentIdleCount

The number of threads in the server’s execution queue that are idle or which are not used to process data.

PendingRequestCurrentCount

The number of pending requests that are in the server’s execution queue.

TransactionCommittedTotalCount

The total number of transactions that are processed by the WebLogic server.

TransactionRolledBackTotalCount

The total number of transactions that are rolled back.

InvocationTotalCount

The total number of times that a servlet running on the WebLogic server was invoked.

Before you can use the WebLogic monitors, you must perform additional steps outside of Uptime Infrastructure Monitor. The steps performed depend on the version of your WebLogic server: WebLogic monitoring requires that you enable the Internet Inter-Orb Protocol (IIOP) on your WebLogic server.

Monitoring WebLogic

In order for Uptime Infrastructure Monitor to collect information from a WebLogic server, the the Internet Inter-Orb Protocol (IIOP) must be enabled on your WebLogic server.

To enable prepare your WebLogic server for monitoring, do the following:

  1. Open your WebLogic server in the administration console. 
  2. In the settings for the server, flick the Protocols tab, then the IIOP tab.
  3. Enable IIOP on your server.
  4. Enter a Default IIOP Username.
  5. Enter and confirm a Default IIOP Password for the user.

    The user name and password created here are used when configuring a WebLogic service monitor in Uptime Infrastructure Monitor.

  6. If possible, restart the WebLogic server.

Configuring WebLogic Monitors

To configure monitors for WebLogic, do the following:

  1. In the WebLogic monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • Username
      The IIOP user name you created when you first enabled IIOP on the WebLogic server.
    • Password
      The IIOP password you created when you first enabled IIOP on the WebLogic server.
    • WebLogic Port
      The number of the port number on which the WebLogic server is listening. The default is 7001.
  3. Limit the returned results of a specific resource type by completing some of the following fields:
    • Number of Results
      A limit on the number of matching application resources, whose metrics are collected.
    • EJB Name Regex Filter
      A regular expression used to limit metrics collection to a specific EJB or set of EJBs.
    • Servlet Name Regex Filter
      A regular expression used to limit metrics collection to a specific servlet.
    • JDBC Resource Name Regex Filter
      A regular expression used to limit metrics collection to a specific JDBC resource.
  4. Specify a warning and critical threshold for the following:
    • the appropriate WebLogic metrics
      For more information about each metric, see Connection Pools.
    • Response Time
      This is the length of time a service check takes to complete.
    For more information on using thresholds to set alerts, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  5. To save the data from the thresholds for graphing or reporting, click the Save for Graphing checkbox beside each of the metrics that you selected in the previous step.
  6. Complete the following settings:
  7. Click Finish.

Using WebLogic Monitors when SSL is Enabled (Linux)

To use WebLogic Monitors when SSL is enabled on a Linux machine, do the following:

  1. Download the WebLogic certificate. Use the following steps to download the certificate from your WebLogic server or you can use any other method, such as downloading the certificate with the help of any Web browser.
    1. Open the terminal, and then change the directory and run following command:
      openssl s_client -host <hostname or IP> -port <SSL enabled port number>
      For example: openssl s_client -host 10.1.40.55 -port 7002
    2. Into a new file, copy the output text from "-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----" to "-----END CERTIFICATE-----" and then save it.
  2. Import the certificate into Java truststore.
    1. Open a terminal and change the directory to <Uptime Installation Directory>jre//lib/security
      For example: cd  /usr/local/uptime/jre/lib/security
    2. Run the following command:
      keytool -keystore cacerts -importcert -alias <alias name> -file <certificate file full path>
      For example: keytool -keystore cacerts -importcert -alias weblogic -file  /root/Desktop/certs/newroot.cer
  3. Restart the uptime_core service.
    • Open the terminal and run following command:
      service uptime_core restart
  4. Configure the WebLogic Service Monitor.
    • While configuring the WebLogic Service Monitor, check the Use SSL checkbox and provide the SSL-enabled port number in the Port field.

Using WebLogic Monitors when SSL is Enabled (Windows)

To use WebLogic Monitors when SSL is enabled on a Windows machine, do the following:

  1. Download the WebLogic certificate. Use the following steps to download the certificate from your WebLogic server or you can use any other method, such as downloading the certificate with the help of any Web browser.
    1. Download OpenSSL. For Windows, use the following link: http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/openssl.htm
    2. Install OpenSSL.
    3. Open a command prompt run as administrator, and change the directory to the bin location where you installed OpenSSL.
    4. Run following command: openssl s_client -host <hostname or IP> -port <SSL enabled port number>
      For example: openssl s_client -host 10.1.40.55 -port 7002
    5. Copy the output text from "-----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----" to "-----END CERTIFICATE-----" in a new text file and save it.
  2. Import the certificate into Java truststore.
    1. Open Command prompt (Run as administrator) and change directory to <Uptime Installation Directory>/jre/lib/security
      For example: cd C:\Program Files\uptimesoftware\uptime\jre7\lib\security
    2. Run the following command:
      keytool -keystore cacerts -importcert -alias <alias name> -file <certifcate file full path>
      For example: keytool -keystore cacerts -importcert -alias weblogic -file C:\certs\newroot.cer
  3. Restart Uptime services.
    1. Open services.msc.
    2. Restart the following services: Uptime Controller, Uptime Data Collector and Uptime Web Browser.
  4. Configure the WebLogic Service Monitor.
    • While configuring WebLogic Service Monitor, check the Use SSL checkbox and provide the SSL-enabled port number in the Port field.

WebSphere

WebSphere is a software platform that provides firms with an environment for developing and deploying Web services and E-Commerce applications. Because WebSphere is large and complex, it can be difficult to pinpoint the source of a problem, especially when that problem is intermittent.

The Uptime Infrastructure Monitor WebSphere monitor collects data that you can use to generate a report, which gives you a historical view of problems that occur on a WebSphere server. For more information about viewing WebSphere issues, see See WebSphere Report.

The WebSphere monitor enables you to collect data so that you can:

  • determine whether the server can cope with its load
  • determine the cause of problems with the server
  • collect and retain data for later graphing and reporting

The following table lists the counters the WebSphere monitor collects from a WebSphere Application Server.

Variable

Counters

Connection pools

PoolSize

The size of the connection pool to the data source.

FreePoolSize

The number of free connections in the pool.

PercentUsed

The percentage of the connection pool that is currently in use.

WaitTime

The average time, in milliseconds, that a connection is used. The average time is the difference between the time at which the connection is allocated and the time at which it is returned.

 

CreateCount

The total number of connections that were created.

CloseCount

The total number of connections that were closed.

WaitingThreadCount

The number of threads that are currently waiting for a connection.

UseTime

The average time, in milliseconds, that a connection is used. The average use time is the difference between the time at which the connection is allocated and that time at which it is returned.

Per EJB

CreateCount

The number of times that the Enterprise JavaBeans that are running on the server were created.

RemoveCount

The number of times that the EJBs were removed.

PassivateCount

The number of times that EJBs were removed from the cache. Note that passivation preserves the state of the EJBs on the disk

MethodCallCount

The total number of method calls that were made to the EJBs.

MethodResponseTime

The average response time, in milliseconds, on the bean methods.

Java Virtual Machine

cpuUsage

The percent of CPU resources that were used since the last query.

HeapSize

The total amount of memory that is available for the JVM.

UsedMemory

The amount of memory that is used by the JVM.

Other

ActiveCount

The number of global transactions which are concurrently active.

CommittedCount

The total number of global transactions that are committed.

RolledBackCount

The total number of global transactions that were rolled back.

LiveCount

The number of servlet sessions that are currently cached in memory.

PoolSize

The average number of threads in the servlet connection thread pool.

TimeSinceLastActivated

The difference, in milliseconds, between the previous and current access time stamps of a servlet session. This counter does not include session time out values.

Before Uptime Infrastructure Monitor can start collecting performance data from a WebSphere server, you must deploy the WebSphere performance servlet.

Deploying the WebSphere Performance Servlet

The WebSphere performance servlet uses WebSphere’s Performance Monitor Interface (PMI) infrastructure to retrieve performance information from a WebSphere Application Server. The information that the servlet collects is saved to an XML file.

By default, the PMI is enabled on the WebSphere server and is set to collect the performance metrics that Uptime Infrastructure Monitor supports. Before Uptime Infrastructure Monitor can begin collecting information from a WebSphere server, you must deploy the performance servlet in the WebSphere directory that contains your Web application.

The following steps must be completed for each Web application server that you want to monitor with Uptime Infrastructure Monitor.

To deploy the performance servlet do the following:

  1. On the WebSphere server, locate the following file:
    install_root/perfServletApp.ear
    Where install_root is the directory under which WebSphere is installed.
  2. Copy the file perfServletApp.ear to the directory in which your Web application is installed. For example:
    install_root/installedApps/<cell_name>/DefaultApplication.ear/DefaultApplication.war/WEB-INF/classes
    Where:
    •  install_root is the directory under which WebSphere is installed.
    •  <cell_name> is the name of the WebSphere node under which your Web application is installed.
Deploying the Performance Servlet on WebSphere 

If you are using WebSphere Application Server, you must change two settings in the WebSphere management console to avoid an Access Denied error when Uptime Infrastructure Monitor attempts to connect to the performance servlet to collect metrics.

To make the changes, do the following:

  1. In the WebSphere management console, modify the following settings:
  2. Under Security - Secure administration, applications, and infrastructure, enable the Application Security option.
  3. Under Enterprise Applications - perfServletApp - Security role to user/group mapping, disable the Everyone option, and enable the All authenticated option.
  4. Restart the server. Uptime Infrastructure Monitor should now be able to connect to the servlet and gather performance metrics.

Configuring WebSphere Monitors

To configure a WebSphere monitor, do the following:

  1. On the WebSphere monitor template, complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following fields:
    • WebSphere Port
      The number of the port number on which WebSphere is listening. The default is 9080.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. Optionally, click the Save for Graphing checkbox beside the Response Time option to save the data for a metric to the DataStore, which can be used to generate a report or graph.
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

Web Application Transactions

Web Transaction Monitor is Java-based and does NOT work with modern browsers. Creating new monitors is disabled. This monitor works only if your UIM installation already has previously-captured Web Transaction monitor recordings. This does not affect previously-configured Web Transaction Monitors.

A Web transaction is a series of Web pages that together fulfill a specific function for end users. A common Web transaction example is the checkout process on an e-commerce site, during which end users select a shipping option, pay for their items, and have their credit card verified. During this transaction, many calls are made to the application and data layers as the end-user provides, and the servers process, information.

Although the type of Web application that is monitored by Uptime Infrastructure Monitor users is typically different (e.g., intranet applications), the structure of the transaction is the same: an end user steps through a sequence of Web pages that take inputted information and initiate appropriate actions with application or database servers.

The Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Web Application Transaction monitor tests the speed and availability of an end-user Web transaction. Specifically, the Web Application Transaction monitor performs two roles:

  • it confirms the general availability of an end-user Web transaction by executing a previously recorded script then reporting whether all pages that make up the web transaction were successfully processed
  • it reports on the speed of the Web transaction both as a whole, and broken down by previously defined stages

Both the availability and speed of Web transactions can be used in reports and as triggers for alerts.

Using the Web Application Transaction Monitor

Use the Web Application Transaction monitor to record a series of URLs that together make up a transaction. This recording should be of a transaction that acts as a suitable test of your Web application delivery infrastructure.

During the recording process, declare checkpoints that demarcate significant stages in the Web transaction. Isolating the different stages in an end-user transaction allows you to view stage-specific speed tests in reports, which ultimately helps you identify where problem areas exist.

For example, if a transaction relies on processing on the application layer, makes multiple calls to the data layer, and is accessible worldwide, creating checkpoints during the recording phase helps you ascertain whether the application server, database management server, or network may be the reason behind a poorly performing transaction.

The following sample checkpoints could be created for an e-commerce transaction:

  • Browse Catalog
  • Add to Shopping Cart
  • Checkout
  • Credit Card Validation

The following sample checkpoints could be created for an internal office transaction:

  • Login
  • Browse Orders
  • View Order Details

Configuring Web Application Transaction Monitors

You can define Web application transactions by manually stepping through one and declaring checkpoints at key stages:

  1. Open a Web browser, and configure its proxy settings so that you can record a transaction:
    • Open the dialog where network and connection settings are made.
    • Configure the browser’s proxy to “localhost” on port 8001.
    • Ensure these settings also are applied to SSL or secure communications.
    • Set the proxy to bypass the Monitoring Station.
      This step requires you to select an option such as “no proxy” or “bypass proxy server,” and may also require you to manually enter your Monitoring Station URL or IP address.
    Using the monitor as a proxy allows it to intercept Web traffic as you generate it.
  2. In the browser, navigate to the starting point of the Web application whose performance you are monitoring.
  3. In the Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Add Service window, select the Web Application Transaction monitor, then click Continue.
    The Web Application Transaction Recorder is displayed, and the monitor is now listening on port 8001 for traffic.

    Ensure your browser's Java plugin is updated to the latest, most secure version.

  4. Begin stepping through the Web transaction as an end user, providing the required data or actions.
    Every URL visited during the transaction is logged and displayed in the recorder.

    The Web Application Transaction monitor records all data inputted during recording: this includes any login information. It is recommended that you use a test account for the Web application, otherwise any user data is visible in the recorded script.
  5. At each major step in the Web transaction that signals a new analysis point, enter a checkpoint name in the text box at the top of the window, then click Mark Checkpoint.
    For example, create a checkpoint at a transaction step where the application takes user-inputted data and makes database calls.

    You can later set Warning and Critical thresholds that apply to every segment declared in your recording. It is recommended that the divisions between your checkpoint intervals are reasonably consistent.
  6. Continue to repeat steps 4 and 5 until you have completed enough of the Web transaction to test it, then click Next.
  7. Complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.

    Even though the Web application performance is not directly tied to an Element’s performance, making this selection is still required: the service based on this monitor needs to be associated with an Element in order to be viewed in areas such as Global Scan or Infrastructure.
  8. Configure the Web Application Transaction Settings:
    • Script to play back
      If desired, optimize the playback script (e.g., remove extraneous URLs such as image downloads).
    • Text that must appear
      Enter a text string that can be used to confirm the script playback was successful (e.g., a phrase that appears on the final page of the application). If the monitor does not find this text, its status changes to Critical. By providing mandatory text, you can ensure an alert is triggered in cases where a Web application is malfunctioning, but checkpoint-to-checkpoint times are fast enough to fulfill response time requirements.
    • Text that must not appear
      Enter a text string that should not appear at any point during the script playback (e.g., a client- or server-error HTTP status code). If the monitor finds this text, its status changes to Critical. Use this feature, as you would use mandatory text, to ensure a malfunctioning application triggers an alert.
    • User Agent String
      Select the Web browser and version used to record the script. This selection determines the user agent string used in the HTTP requests to the application server, and should be provided in case the application blocks access by scripts.
    • Checkpoint Times
      Enter the Warning and Critical Checkpoint Time thresholds. An alert is generated with these thresholds if any of the recorded Web transaction’s checkpoint times exceeds the supplied values.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. An alert is generated with this threshold if the entire transaction playback time exceeds the supplied values. For more information, see See Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds .
  9. Enter Warning- and Critical-level thresholds for the overall response time of the monitor.
    Most of the monitor’s Response Time is comprised of the Delivery Time and the Retrieve Time. Ensure the values provided for the Response Time thresholds roughly correspond with those provided for the other thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  10. Complete the following settings:
  11. Click Finish.

Viewing and Diagnosing Web Transaction Performance

To view Web transaction performance via playback, create a Service Metrics graph for the Web Application Transaction monitor’s system. To generate a Service Metrics graph, either select the system to which the Web Application Transaction monitor is associated in Infrastructure, or the monitor itself in the main Services panel. Click the Graphics tab, then click Service Metrics.

The Service Metrics graph shows how long each transaction segment took to complete during playback, and in doing so, provides an end-to-end performance snapshot of the components of your infrastructure that deliver applications to users. For example, the following metrics graph shows that the execution of the comments found in checkpoint3 took excessively long to complete:

Because other checkpoints performed well, the poor performance of a single checkpoint indicates possible issues with a particular server, and not the network infrastructure. This theory can be further investigated by looking at the performance metrics for the server in question.

Use the Web Application Transaction monitor’s playback script to verify which servers are used during a problem checkpoint. In the Service Instances panel, click the monitor to view the script, then locate the system that is accessed (e.g., with GET and POST commands). Use this as an investigative starting point: although an application or Web server is often referenced in the script, the problem may be found deeper in the application stack (e.g., a database server to which the referenced Web server makes calls during the checkpoint).

Using Web Transaction Performance in SLA Reports

Your Web applications typically call on systems on the application and database tiers, as well as make use of internal- and external-facing network devices. Because the Web Application Transaction monitor directly reports on the performance of a Web transaction, it in effect indirectly reports on the health of your IT infrastructure as a whole.

This broad reporting coverage makes the Web Application Transaction monitor an ideal monitor to include in service level agreement reports.

For more information on SLA reports, see Reports for Service Level Agreements.

Email Delivery Monitor

Although specific Uptime Infrastructure Monitor monitors are available for your POP, IMAP, and SMTP servers, their monitoring duties focus on availability and response time. To test your IT infrastructure’s ability to send or receive emails within a reasonable amount of time, use the Email Delivery monitor.

Typically, email delivery tests include a server that is part of your IT infrastructure and monitored by Uptime Infrastructure Monitor. In these cases, you must test either incoming mail delivery times by supplying information about a monitored POP3 or IMAP server, or test outgoing mail delivery times by supplying information about a monitored SMTP server.

The Email Delivery executes several steps in order to calculate mail delivery and retrieval time:

  • the monitor requests an internal or external SMTP server to send a generated test mail (when the monitor asks the SMTP server to send the mail, the monitor records the delivery time)
  • the monitor waits for five seconds, then logs in to and checks an internal or external POP3 or IMAP mail server to verify the mail was received
  • if the test mail is not found, the monitor waits another five seconds and checks again (and continues to check until the process has either timed out or the mail is found)
  • the monitor confirms the mail was received and reports both the delivery and retrieval times

Configuring Email Delivery Monitors

Define the Email Delivery monitor by providing information about the outgoing and incoming mail servers:

  1. Complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.

    Once created, the Email Delivery monitor service can be included with status reports for the system or group you select. If this monitor is reporting outgoing mail delivery times, the system should be a monitored SMTP server; if incoming mail delivery times are measured, the system should be a monitored POP3/IMAP mail server.

  2. Complete the Outgoing Email Settings:
    • SMTP Hostname
      Provide the name or IP address of the SMTP server.
    • SMTP Port
      Provide the port used to communicate with the SMTP server. Leave this field blank to use the default SMTP port (25).
    • SMTP Username
      Provide the authenticated SMTP user name.
    • SMTP Password
      Provide the authenticated SMTP user password.
    • SMTP Uses SSL
      Specify whether the SMTP server sends and receives encrypted communication using SSL.
    • Destination Email Address
      Enter the test email address used by the monitor. The monitor sends an email to this address, and this address is checked for receipt of the test email.

      Although the Email Delivery monitor attempts to promptly find and delete test emails, network issues may prevent timely cleanups. To avoid potential Inbox clutter, it is recommended that you create a dedicated test email account as the destination address.

    • Delivery Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Delivery Time thresholds. The smallest unit of time used for these thresholds is seconds. Given the speed at which SMTP servers should finish processing an outgoing email, is it recommended that you set the Warning threshold to one second.
  3. Complete the Incoming Email Settings:
    • POP3/IMAP Hostname
      Provide the name or IP address of the mail server.
    • POP3/IMAP Port
      Provide the port used to communicate with the mail server. Leave this field blank to use the default POP3 or IMAP port (110 and 143, respectively).
    • POP3/IMAP Username
      Provide the login name for the destination email account.
    • POP3/IMAP Password
      Provide the password for the destination email account.
    • POP3/IMAP Uses SSL
      Specify whether the mail server sends and receives encrypted communication using SSL.
    • Retrieve Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical retrieval time thresholds. The smallest unit of time used for these thresholds is seconds, and the monitor checks for receipt of the test mail in five-second intervals. Enter values in multiples of five.
  4. Enter Warning- and Critical-level thresholds for the overall response time of the monitor.
    Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. An alert is generated with this threshold if the combined email delivery and response time exceeds the supplied values. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  5. Complete the following settings:
  6. Click Finish.

Diagnosing and Reporting Email Delivery Problems

If the Email Delivery monitor reaches a Critical state, the first investigation step is to review the message produced by Uptime Infrastructure Monitor. In the System Status panel, view the message belonging to the system to which the monitor is attached, which should point you in the right direction. For example, the status message below indicates the monitor reached a critical state because the retrieval time from an external POP3 server exceeded the defined threshold; your SMTP server is most likely not responsible for the delay:

Speculation based on the status message can be confirmed using a Service Metrics graph for the Email Delivery monitor’s system.  This graph indicates whether the delivery and retrieval time are within acceptable limits (below left), or if one or both are unusually long (below right):

To generate a Service Metrics graph, either select the system to which the Email Delivery monitors are associated in Infrastructure, or the monitor itself in the main Services panel. Click the Graphics tab, then click Service Metrics.

Even if the Service Metrics graph indicates delivery and retrieval times are not exceeding defined thresholds (and Uptime Infrastructure Monitor is not sending out critical alerts), it is still an ideal investigative starting point if you are getting critical feedback from your users about email delivery times.

If the Email Delivery monitor’s Service Metrics graph confirms that there are delays somewhere within your network infrastructure, you can investigate further by using the service monitor you created for your mail server. Co-ordinate your Email Delivery monitor’s metrics graphs or reports with those from a service monitor you have assigned to your mail server (e.g. Exchange) while focusing on metrics that may be related outgoing or incoming mail time delays.  For example, in the Exchange service monitor metrics graph below, the mail server experienced a high SMTP Local Queue Length that did not always coincide with the SMTP Messages Per Second count:

Splunk Query

Splunk is a third-party search engine that indexes log files and data from the devices, servers, and applications in your network. Using Splunk, you can quickly analyze your logs to pinpoint problems on a server or in a network, or ensure that you are in compliance with a regulatory mandate, or service level agreements. You install Splunk on a server in your datacenter.

When you integrate Uptime Infrastructure Monitor and Splunk, a Splunk icon appears beside any service that is in a WARN or CRIT state, when viewing the service in a monitoring or diagnostic view (e.g., the My Alerts section of My Portal, the Outages list or Status page for an Element):

Clicking this icon takes you to your Splunk search page.

You can use the Splunk Query monitor to perform Splunk queries on log files to pinpoint an error condition.

Before you can use a Splunk Query monitor, you must add settings to your Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Configuration panel that allow Uptime Infrastructure Monitor to interface with your Splunk installation. See Splunk Settings for more information.

Configuring Splunk Query Monitors

To configure a Splunk Query monitor, do the following:

  1. Complete the monitor information fields.
    See Monitor Identification for more information.
  2. Complete the Splunk Query Settings:
    • Splunk query
      The Splunk query string that is used to search the log file for an error condition. You can enter any Splunk query string in this field. For example, the following searches the log files for any instances of sendmail and error in relation to the mailServer host within the last two hours:
      host::mailServer sendmail error hoursago::2
      For more information on the syntax of Splunk queries, refer to search information found in the Splunk User Manual.

      To minimize the risk of the monitor timing out, avoid using open-ended queries; instead use relative time ranges for a block of time, or with the snap-to-time modifier such as [email protected] (yesterday starting from 12:00:00 AM).

    • Result count of splunk query
      Enables Uptime Infrastructure Monitor to alert you when the number of results that match your Splunk query exceeds the defined warning and critical thresholds.
      For example, you can configure the monitor to issue a Warning alert when five or more Splunk results matching your query are returned, and a Critical alert when 10 or more results for your query are returned.
    • Response Time
      Enter the Warning and Critical Response Time thresholds. For more information, see Configuring Warning and Critical Thresholds.
  3. To save the result-count or response-time data for graphing or reporting, click the Save for Graphing checkbox beside the appropriate checkbox(es).
  4. Complete the following settings:
  5. Click Finish.

Live Splunk Listener

Live Splunks are scheduled searches of Splunk queries that are saved on the Splunk server. A Live Splunk automatically runs a search, can initiate an alert, and can perform actions based on that alert. You can, for example, set up a Live Splunk to search for all critical error conditions.

The Live Splunk Listener monitor enables you to capture the information generated by a Live Splunk (from Splunk 4.x only). This monitor is very similar to the External Check monitor, and uses scripts that are bundled with Uptime Infrastructure Monitor (found in the /scripts subdirectory) to return Live Splunk information to the Monitoring Station.

To use this monitor, you must first modify the two Splunk scripts that are included with Uptime Infrastructure Monitor:

  • alertUptimeStatusHandler.sh
  • alertUptime.py

This pair of scripts take the following options:

  • --message
    A message that is returned to the Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Monitoring Station. For example, if the Live Splunk is configured to search for warning conditions, you can enter the message “Changed to WARN” .
  •  --status
    The script can return the following status codes:
    •  0 - OK
      The services are functioning properly.
    •  1 - Warning
      There is a potential problem with one of more of the monitored services.
    •  2 - Critical
      There is a critical problem with one or more of the monitored services.
    •  3 - Unknown
      There is an error in the configuration of the monitor itself, or Uptime Infrastructure Monitor cannot execute the service check.
  •  --monitor
    The name of the Uptime Infrastructure Monitor monitor to which the information from the Live Splunk is directed.

The following is an example of the script with all of its options specified:

alertUptimeStatusHandler.sh --message="sendmail has some traffic going through new command!"
                            --status=2 --monitorName="Live Splunk"

Uptime Infrastructure Monitor captures the output from the script, which appears in the service status section of the Global Scan dashboard (see Understanding the Status of Services). The Uptime Infrastructure Monitor monitoring framework picks up any error codes and triggers the appropriate monitoring action.

Before You Begin

Before you can monitor Live Splunks generated on a Splunk server, you must do the following:

  1. Edit the alertUptime.py script to point to the Uptime Infrastructure Monitor Monitoring Station:
    • Navigate to the /scripts directory on the Monitoring Station.
    • Open the file alertUptime.py in a text editor.
    • Find the following entry in the file:

      host = "uptime-host"
      port = "9996"
    • Change the values for host and port to the host name and port of the Monitoring Station.
    • Save and close the file.
  2. Edit the alertUptimeStatusHandler.sh script to configure how the Live Splunk is reported on the Monitoring Station:
    • Open alertUptimeStatusHandler.sh in a text editor (found in the /scripts directory on the Monitoring Station).
    • For the message option, enter a diagnostic message that accompanies a Live Splunk captured by the Uptime Infrastructure Monitor service monitor.
    • For the status option, enter the status of the monitored service.
    • For the monitorName option, enter the name of the service monitor that is listening to the Live Splunk.
    • Save and close the file.
  3. Copy the alertUptimeStatusHandler.sh and alertUptime.py scripts from the Monitoring Station’s /scripts directory to the
    /data/splunk/bin/scripts directory on the Splunk server.
  4. Configure a Live Splunk. For information on configuring Live Splunks, see the Splunk user manual.
    When setting up your Live Splunk, select the Run the shell script option on the configuration page. Then, enter the path to alertUptimeStatusHandler.sh in the field.

Configuring the Live Splunk Listener Monitor

To configure a Live Splunk Listener monitor, do the following:

  1. Complete the monitor information fields.
    To learn how to configure monitor information fields, see Monitor Identification.
  2. Complete the following settings:
  3. Click Finish.

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