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Multi-CPU Usage

The Multi-CPU Usage graph charts the performance statistics for systems with more than one CPU. These statistics indicate whether a system is effectively balancing tasks between CPUs, or if processes are forced off CPUs in certain circumstances. You can also use this graph to determine whether there are too many system interrupts that are using a CPU or that are overloading a CPU.

Uptime Infrastructure Monitor can also collect and chart information for systems running Net-SNMP that have two or more CPUs. However, if the system was recently added to Uptime Infrastructure Monitor, or if the HOST-RESOURCES MIB - which is used to collect data from the system - is not properly installed and configured, Uptime Infrastructure Monitor cannot collect CPU performance data. You must either wait until Uptime Infrastructure Monitor is able to collect performance data, or check whether the HOST-RESOURCES MIB is properly installed and configured on the monitored system that is monitored.

Info

If there is only one CPU on the system, the following message is displayed instead of a graph:

This system is currently listed as only having one CPU.

Generating a Multi-CPU Usage Graph

To generate a Multi-CPU Usage graph, do the following:
  1. On the Global Scan dashboard or Infrastructure panel, click the name of the system whose information you want to graph.
  2. In the Tree panel, click the Graphing tab.
  3. Click Multi-CPU Usage.
  4. Select and apply the start and end dates and times for which the graph charts data. For more information, see Understanding Dates and Times.
    Click one of Uptime Infrastructure Monitor displays options based on the type of system you selected to graph and presents additional options based on each selection.
  5. Click from the following options:
    • User %: the percentage of CPU user processes that are in use. For Windows systems, this option is % User Time
    • System %: the percentage of CPU kernel processes that are in use. For Windows systems, this option is % System Time
    • % Privileged Time: on Windows systems, the percentage of time that the CPU spends executing kernel commands
    • Wait I/O %: the percentage of time that a process which can be run must wait for a device to perform an I/O operation
    • SMTX: the number of read or write locks that a thread was not able to acquire on the first attempt, as reported by the mpstat command

      Info
      While it is trying to acquire locks, the thread is active but is not performing any tasks.
    • XCAL - : the number of interprocess cross-calls

      In a multi-processor environment, one processor sends cross-calls to another processor to get that processor to do work. Cross-calls can also be used to ensure consistency in virtual memory. Heavy file system activity, such as NFS, can result in a high number of cross-calls.

    • Interrupts: the number of CPU interrupts (on Windows systems, this option is % Interrupt Time)
      Interrupts are a mechanism that a device uses to signal to the kernel that it needs attention, and that immediate processing is required on its behalf.
    • Interrupts/sec: on Windows systems, rate at which CPU handles interrupts from applications or hardware each second
      If the value for Interrupts/sec is high, there could be problems with the hardware on the system.
    • Total %: on Windows systems, this option is % Total and is the total amount of % User Time, % Privileged Time, and % Interrupt Time
  6. Select the CPUs to graph from the Choose CPUs to graph list.
  7. Click Generate Graph.

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Graphing TCP Retransmits

The TCP Retransmits graph indicates whether data is transmitted over a network. Using TCP, information is transmitted in pieces called packets. A packet consists of:

A header

Contains transmission information, such as the IP addresses of the sender and receiver, the protocol used, and the packet number.

A payload

Contains the sent data.

A trailer

Contains data that denotes the end of the packet, as well as error correction information.

TCP retransmits indicate that certain network services may not be completing properly because of a high load on a network or a system. A lost packet can indicate network congestion, and requires the sender to reduce the transmission rate and to retransmit the packet. A slower transmission rate combined with retransmitted packets reduces network performance.

Generating a TCP Retransmits Graph

To generate a TCP retransmits graph, do the following:
  1. On the Global Scan dashboard or Infrastructure panel, click the name of the system whose information you want to graph.
  2. In the tree panel, click the Graphing tab.
  3. Click TCP Retransmits.
  4. Select the start and end dates and times for which the graph charts data. For more information, see Understanding Dates and Times.
  5. Click Generate Graph.

Graphing User Activity

Uptime Infrastructure Monitor uses the following graphs to chart the activity of users on a Linux or UNIX system:

Login History

The number of times or frequency at which a user has logged into a system during any 30 minute time interval.

Sessions

The number of sessions or number of distinct users who are logged into a system during any 30 minute time interval.

Using these graphs, an administrator can identify user load and whether there is any correlation between user logins or number of sessions and problems with the performance of the system. These graphs use the same input criteria, but they return different data.

Generating a User Activity Graph

To generate a user activity graph, do the following:
  1. On the Global Scan dashboard or Infrastructure panel, click the name of the system whose information you want to graph.
  2. In the tree panel, click the Graphing tab.
  3. Click either Login History or Sessions.
  4. Select the start and end dates and times for which the graph charts data. For more information, see Understanding Dates and Times.
  5. Click Generate Graph.
Info

If there is no data to graph, the message No Data found for the given time range appears in the graph window.

 

Workload Graphs

The three workload graphs determine the demand that network and local services are putting on a system. The graphs chart an aggregate amount of performance information for a given user, group, or process.

You can generate the following workload graphs:

Workload - User

The demand that network and local services are putting on the system, based on the IDs of the users who are logged into a system.

Workload - Group

The demand that network and local services are putting on the system, based on the IDs of the user groups that are logged into a system.

Workload - Process Name

The demand that network and local services are putting on a system, based on the processes that are running.

These graphs use the same input criteria, but they return different data.

Each workload graph captures the following metrics:

CPU %

The percentage of CPU time that is taken up by a user, group, or process.

Memory Size

The amount of the page file and virtual memory that is taken up by a user, group, or process.

On Windows systems, Memory Size is called Virtual Bytes.

RSS

The Run Set Size, which is the amount of physical memory used by a user, group, or process. On Windows systems, RSS is called Working Set.

Info

Graphs generated for SNMP agents only chart the memory metric.

 

Generating a Workload Graph

To generate a workload graph, do the following:
  1. On the Global Scan dashboard or Infrastructure panel, click the name of the system whose information you want to graph.
  2. In the tree panel, click the Graphing tab.
  3. Click one of the following options:
    Select Workload.
  4. Select and apply the start and end dates and times for which the graph charts data. For more information, see Understanding Dates and Times.
  5. Use the available Quick Graphs or click one of the following options:
  6. Click one of the following metrics:
    • See CPU %.
    • See Memory Size. or Virtual Bytes (on UNIX and Windows, respectively)
    • See RSS. or Working Set (on UNIX and Windows, respectively)

      Info
      You can only graph one metric at a time.
  7. Select one or more of the available users, groups, or processes from the list.
    If you are generating a workload graph by processes, (i.e., Workload - Process Name graph), enter a regular expression in the Process Selection Regex field to automatically add matching process names for graphing, and avoid dealing with ungainly lists of system processes.

    Info
    The list of available process varies by server and by operating system.
  8. Click Add.
  9. Click Generate Graph.

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The percentage of time that the CPU spends executing Windows kernel commands. If this metric is consistently high you should consider using a faster or more efficient disk subsystem.

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