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Instance Motion Graphs

The VMware VMotion tool enables you to move ESX instances from one server to another without any downtime or loss of data. You would use VMotion to, for example, move an instance to newer and faster hardware, or to temporarily relocate the instance while performing a hardware upgrade.The Instance Motion graph enables you to keep track of a moving Hyper-V or VMware instance. For a given ESX instance, the graph charts which systems it is running on over a given time range.

Generating an Instance Motion Graph

To generate an Instance Motion graph, do the following:
  1. On the Global Scan dashboard or Infrastructure panel, click the name of the ESX instance whose motion you want to graph.
  2. In the tree panel, click the Graphing tab.
  3. Click Instance Motion.
  4. Select the start and end dates and times for which the graph charts data.  For more information, see Understanding Dates and Times.
  5. Click Generate Graph.

Displaying Detailed Process Information

Detailed process information provides an insight into how various user and system processes are consuming system resources. The information is not presented in a graph - but it is a table that contains the following information:

  • Process
    The name of the process, which is taken from its executed path name.
  • PID
    The number that identifies the process.
  • PPID
    The number that identifies the parent process. The PPID can help identify possible relationships between processes.
    On Windows systems, the PPID is called the Creating Process ID.
  • UID
    The ID of the user or account that is consuming CPU time.
    On Windows systems, the UID is called the Owner.
  • GID
    The ID of the group that is consuming CPU time.
    On Windows systems, the GID is called the Group Name.
  • Memory Used
    The amount of memory, expresses as a percentage of total available memory, consumed by a process.
    On Windows systems, Memory Used is called Virtual Bytes .
    The Memory Used value can be misleading because shared memory between processes is counted multiple times. For example, if five Oracle processes are using 10% of available memory, this does not indicate that Oracle is consuming 50% of system memory.
  • RSS
    Run Set Size - the amount of physical memory used.
    On Windows systems, RSS is called the Working Set.
  • CPU %
    The percentage of the CPU time used by the process, calculated by dividing total used CPU Time by the process’ running time; if applicable, the result is further divided by the number of CPUs for the Element on which the process is running.
    On Windows systems, the CPU % is called % Processor Time.
  • User Time
    The amount of time (in seconds) that a particular user, group, or account is using the CPU.
    This value is not displayed for Windows systems.
  • User System Time
    The amount of time (in seconds) that a process is consuming system time on the CPU.
    This value is not displayed for Windows systems.

    Info

    You can get a better indication of the amount of work a process has done by dividing this amount by a sample of time - for example, five minutes.

  • Start Time
    The time at which the process started. This can be used to determine the lifetime of a process.

    Info

    The process information for the current date and time is displayed in the Graphing subpanel.

Generating Detailed Process Information

To display detailed process information, do the following:
  1. On the Global Scan dashboard or Infrastructure panel, click the name of the system whose information you want to graph.
  2. In the tree panel, click the Graphing tab.
  3. Click Detailed Process Information.
  4. Select the start and end dates and times for which the graph charts data.  For more information, see Understanding Dates and Times.
  5. Click Display Process Information.
    A window containing a chart that lists the process information for the time period that you specified appears.
  6. From the dropdown list, select the date and time for which you want to view process information.

The percentage of time that the CPU spends executing Windows kernel commands. If this metric is consistently high you should consider using a faster or more efficient disk subsystem.

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